Do we create our own luck when we align with dharma?

 

Photography by © Beth Ortman Studio

Photography by © Beth Ortman Studio

Do we create our own luck when we align with dharma?

I will ask up front, is this even a valid question? With that being said, I want to explore this notion. In the last couple of weeks, I have been listening a lot to the On Being radio interviews while doing my artwork. Krista Tippett generally starts her interviews off with discovering a little about the subject's upbringing. For the most part I have started with the musicians and the artists that she interviews. I find music to be an essential component of my life and a necessity to my art.

There is a theme that has come up over and over and it is that of "following your authenticity" or "following your dharma" as well as these people seem to be enormously curious. Someone in these interviewee's life made some level of impression on them that this message stuck. Now comes in the question of luck. Is the luck that they were raised by someone giving them that advice, or met someone important to them or were they open to it when they heard it? Does luck play into anything or is it a case of being open to threads of advice and happen-stance? I find this to be a fascinating question because luck seems so impersonal and these stories are full of personal meaning. For me art is motivated by the personal and it becomes universal when it achieves its own voice. There is a separation of the work of art and the artist once it is released into the world, but when it is being made, it comes from repetition, and doing the work. It is done from love, obsession, compulsion, curiosity, discipline, self-hatred, self-sacrifice, self-love... I could go on with the dichotomies.

The artist or musician, writer or physicist, etc. sits in their studio space creating something. Some work on their vision for years before it is shared and some get recognition. Most do not but that never stops them from continuing, This is where the dharma piece comes in. In the spiritual readings that I have been researching, and also my interpretation of them, it seems that following your path and aligning with dharma is what we are all here to do. In the case of the artist, there is a tangible, musical or theoretical "thing" that comes from this work. At what point is it that the person is strong enough to follow their dharma? When do they here that it is okay to create something regardless of its outcome?

If that person is moved into the limelight that gains an audience, is that luck? Or is it the following and aligning of dharma that becomes so strong and so matched that it moves past its creator and becomes so much more?

Anita Pollitzer wrote back and forth with Georgia O'Keeffe in the early career years when O'Keeffe was teaching in Amarillo, TX. Pollitzer presented O'Keeffe's watercolor sketches to Alfred Stieglitz in NYC many times. There was a point in this exchange of letters where Pollitzer announces to O'Keeffe that her vision had become universal. Stieglitz saw it and started to represent O'Keeffe in his gallery. Her work became universal and it became its own entity.

Luck or dharma? Where is the intersection of personal voice, hard work, luck and dharma? What are the crossroads that we come to that make our paths open to luck?

~ b

Check out On Being with Krista Tippett ... it is a treasure of thought-provoking ideas

Aligning Courage & Vision

 

image.jpg

This is an update to an earlier post. I think I will always be refining and updating my words. 

The Proof is in, well, the Proof: Aligning Courage & Vision

My book, “Zen and the Art of the Sunrise”, just launched this past weekend and the journey has been a pretty humbling experience. When I got my first printed proof to review it was a huge moment of accomplishment. Now I have an ISBN number. Crazy, sexy ISBN (an ode to Kris Carr here).

I never meant to do a book. For three years I took a daily sunrise picture, found an inspirational quote or song lyric and posted it to friends and family on social media. Taking the photographs started as a place of wanting to share this amazing beauty of living on the ocean’s shoreline. The ocean is a calming source - until it isn't. I will take the storms too. I have been taught, moment-by-moment, about change and the immediate upheaval in the atmosphere and about the chance to live another day and be a better person (still working on many things like road rage and my need for sugar – it is all about baby steps).

Whatever our days hold, whether we are doing what we love, sitting in silence, going to a job we love or hate, a day full of errands or care-taking, I am learning that we need to find the soft spot that allows us to be fully present and in the moment. That sentiment can be a place of peace for us as it helps make our day brighter. The sunrise kicks that off for some people. The guys from the Minimalists say (paraphrasing here), "We all get the same 24 hours to create a masterpiece. Picasso, Michelangelo, all had the same 24 hours in a day." That blew my mind intellectually. The sunrises back that up visually and viscerally.

What could I do with my 24 hours? I started to make the book. I organized quotes, I searched for copyright laws, and I reviewed over 6800 photos looking for just the right ones. I had to figure out the publishing world and its options. The process made me look inside myself to determine my voice. My friend said that I needed to get my Sasha Fierce on but I think I am more of a female Lou Reed and Ziggy Stardust type. Her point was well taken though. I had to open up and be more. I had to be vulnerable and I could not shy away from what I wanted to say. It is okay to be messy and pretty all at once. The ocean has taught me a lot about that.

Someone once told me that if she was overwhelmed with cleaning the house, she chose a corner and then chose whether to go left or right. I have used that example many, many times in my life. Whether it is making myself sit down to do artwork, creating this book or designing websites, it is all about moving forward and finding that small place of “okay” and heading outwards from there.

In the end, through making this book, I have a huge sense of accomplishment. I started in a corner and I worked on it in bits and parts. As I send this book out into the world, I want to take a moment to sit quietly with it. It has been a source of love and honor to share the inspiration of these beautiful sunrises. What can we do in our next 24 hours?

~ beth ortman

Click here to buy the book on Amazon -->